Comparison between EELS and AES
- Practical Electron Microscopy and Database -
- An Online Book -

http://www.globalsino.com/EM/  



 

 

=================================================================================

Table 3925. Comparison between EELS and AES 

  EELS AES
Quantification Less complicated More complicated and needs standards
Sensitivity Highly sensitive to low atomic number (Z) elements Highly sensitive to low atomic number (Z) elements
Energy of detected electrons Best range: 100 eV to 1, 000 eV Energies of Auger electrons: 20–500 eV
Surface sensitivity Not very surface-sensitive Highly surface sensitive
Vacuum High vacuum Ultrahigh vacuum
Bulk specimens Applicable for reflection EELS (REELS) Applicable for "backscattering" detection
Spatial resolution < 1 nm for thin TEM films 100 nm for bulk specimens; 2 nm for thin films
Process Energy loss process is the first step after interaction of incident electrons with atoms. Refer to Figure 3925 below. Auger electron generation can originate from energy loss process of incident electrons. Refer to Figure 3925 below.

Figure 3925 shows the schematic illustrations of examples of energy loss process of incident electrons (a), x-ray generation (b), and Auger electron generation (c). EKE1 and EKE2 represent the kinetic energies of the two generated SEs. ΔE1 and ΔE2 represent the energy losses of the incident electrons after the incident electrons interact with the electrons in the K and L3 subshells, respectively. E1 and E2 are the binding energies of the two electrons. E0 is the energy of the incident electrons in the EMs. EKE represents the kinetic energy of Auger electrons.

Schematic illustrations of energy loss process (a), x-ray generation (b), and Auger electron generation (c)

Figure 3925. Schematic illustrations of examples of energy loss process (a), x-ray generation (b), and Auger electron generation (c).

 

=================================================================================