Double Cross-Sections for Examination
of Damage of Prepared EM Sample Surface
- Practical Electron Microscopy and Database -
- An Online Book -

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This book (Practical Electron Microscopy and Database) is a reference for TEM and SEM students, operators, engineers, technicians, managers, and researchers.

 

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A thickness of the amorphous layers induced by FIB beam damage due to EM sample preparation (prepared by FIB), still presents at the faces of the prepared specimen after the final cleaning step. This amorphous layers had been studied by preparing and examining double cross-sectional lamellae (also called cross-sections of the cross-section) [1 - 3]. In the preparation of the double cross-sectional TEM specimen, the two faces of a grid, containing a prepared and examined lamella, can be covered by sputtered gold to protect the lamella and then, the grid can be horizontally mounted and be inserted in the FIB chamber in order to prepare a cross-section from a cross-section TEM specimen as shown in Figure 4496a.

Images illustrating selected steps of the double cross-section experimentImages illustrating selected steps of the double cross-section experimentImages illustrating selected steps of the double cross-section experiment

Figure 4496a. Images illustrating selected steps of the double cross-section experiment [4].

Figure 4496b shows HRTEM image illustrating the amorphous layer at the STO surface (between the sputtered gold and STO in the image) created by FIB sample preparation. STO here represents SrTiO3 materials.

HRTEM image illustrating the amorphous layer created by FIB sample preparation

Figure 4496b. HRTEM image illustrating the amorphous layer at the STO surface
(between the sputtered gold and STO in the image) created by FIB sample preparation [4].

 

[1] Boxtleitner W, Hobler G, Klu¨ ppel V, Cerva H. 2001. Simulation of topography evolution and damage formation during TEM sample preparation using focused ion beams. Nucl Instrum Methods Phys Res B 175/177:102–107.
[2] Langford RM. 2006. Focused ion beams techniques for nanomaterials characterization. Microsc Res Tech 69:538–549.
[3] Rubanov S, Munroe PR. 2004. FIB-induced damage in silicon. J Microsc 214:213–221.
[4] Montoya E, Bals S, Rossell MD, Schryvers D, and Tendeloo GV, Evaluation of Top, Angle, and Side Cleaned FIB Samples for TEM Analysis, Microscopy Research and Technique 70:1060–1071 (2007).

 

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